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Can a young child’s social interactions predict future success in life?  Experts say, “Yes.”

In a 2015 study, researchers found that prosocial behaviors such as cooperation and empathy are “significantly and uniquely predictive” of a child’s likelihood to graduate from high school and college, and to maintain stable employment thereafter. 

These findings offer compelling evidence that “non-cognitive” skills are a necessary part of a child’s upbringing.  However, the question remains…

Why would social behavior be prognostic of academic success, more so than reading, math or any other childhood ability?